Safety and
Efficacy

Yeux Clairs laser procedure is safe and highly effective. In every case we have achieved a notable lightening of the iris after 10 sessions.

The laser acts specifically on the melanine, without affecting any other eye structure. With our laser application technique, only the melanin of the frontal part of the iris is affected without affecting the back layer, responsible of blocking the light soit can only enter to the eye through the pupil.

During all the procedure only subtle changes on the color are observed. A 2 to 3 week period has to pass in order to start to see the changes, and they stabilize up to 2 to 3 months later.

The color obtained after the treatment CANNOT be predicted and CANNOT be chosen. The color depends on multiple factors like the iris initial pigmentation, the slopes in the superficial iris elevation or the color distribution and genetic variations.

The most common iris color obtained after the treatment is gray-blue, from dark to light.

Yeux Clairs laser procedure does not cause any decrease in vision, light sensitivity, chronic inflammation in the eyes, glaucoma, pupil alterations or glasses requirement.

We’ve been applying Yeux Clairs laser procedure without finding any kind of long-term complication. Nevertheless, it is not risk-free, as is with any kind of procedure. The possible short-term complications that could develop, like blurred or cloudy vision, high intraocular pressure, stinging or red eyes, are transitory and disappear in a few hours up to a few days.

Although the procedure is very safe, it is not exempt of potential risks, like:

Due to the application of the laser, it could happen that the iris fibers come together and form a scar that affects the shape of the pupil and loses its circularity. Although this is very rare, when it happens it can affect the way the iris looks once it has lighten up with the procedure. This has no impact on the vision.

In the event that a laser beam crosses into the retina, either by eye movement or through some thinning of the iris, it can result in a burn or hemorrhage of the macular or retinal area risking of creating an area without vision in the visual field that could diminish vision in a transient or permanent way.

Due to the application of the laser, it may happen that the iris gets inflamed, which could cause pain and blurred vision, besides damage to the iris, damage to the cornea and damage to the trabecular meshwork. This is controlled with topical anti-inflammatory medication and generally manages to avoid potential damage to the eye.

As a result of the inflammation caused by the laser impacts on the iris and/or the remains that remain in the eye fluid, the intraocular pressure could rise, usually transiently, which could cause damage to some structure of the eye. This is controlled with topical antihypertensive medication and generally manages to avoid potential damage to the eye.

It could happen that the inflammation caused after the application of the laser generates adhesions of the iris to the trabecular meshwork, which is the natural drainage of the eye. This could lead to glaucoma, which would require specialized treatment that could require surgical treatments for its control. It also could cause tractions on the iris causing discoria (deviations or distortions of the pupil).

During treatment, laser impacts may result in iris bleeding that may result in discontinuation of that treatment session. This usually resolves within the next few days and is not a contraindication for continuing the subsequent laser applications required.

Because the laser passes through the cornea, it is possible to have the situation in which the corneal endothelium, responsible for keeping the cornea clear, could be damaged causing an over-hydration of the cornea. This may cause blurred vision that may require a cornea transplant.

The application of the laser could cross the iris, either through the pupil or through the same iris, and cause damage to the lens, which could occasion the appearance of a cataract, whether acute or chronic. In case of the occurrence of a cataract, a surgical intervention is required to remove it.

Due to the application of the laser, it could happen that the fibers of the iris could separate or break and cause a hole in the iris. Although this is very rare, when it happens it can increase the likelihood of causing a cataract, or a burn or hemorrhage in the macula or retina.

As a consequence of the laser impacts near the constrictor muscle of the pupil, it could be the case that this muscle (or its vascularization) could be damaged and cause permanent pupil dilation (Pupil of Urrets-Zavalía), which would cause high sensitivity to light and presence of optical aberrations.

To avoid any of these risks or complications, it is mandatory to follow all instructions during and after each session, including:

During the laser procedure it is mandatory to stare only where the ophthalmologist says.

After each session, the treatment must be used in the correct way.

Yeux Clairs laser procedure is not for everyone. There are certain conditions that could make the procedure unsuitable or impossible to be performed. These conditions can be, but not limited to:

During the procedure, it is required to be looking at a target while the laser is being applied to the iris. By presenting involuntary or uncontrollable movements of the eyes, the risk that the laser can pass through the pupil increases, causing bleeding or burns in the retina or a cataract.

During the procedure, it is required to remain seated, with minimal movements, while the laser is being applied to the iris. By presenting involuntary or uncontrollable movements of any part of the body, the risk that the laser can pass through the pupil increases, causing bleeding or burns in the retina or a cataract.

These involuntary movements can be: tics, spasms, tremors, contractures, etc.

As the laser causes inflammation within the eye and this inflammation must be absorbed and filtered by the eye, people with a history of diagnosis of glaucoma (either with or without treatment) may develop increased intraocular pressure that could damage the optic nerve.

 

As the laser causes inflammation within the eye, people with history of diagnosis of uveitis could have severe inflammation and develop an episode of anterior uveitis that could lead to complications such as adhesions in the iris, increased intraocular pressure, and all complications associated with anterior uveitis

 

People with history of autoimmune diseases, such as Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriasis, etc., may be at a higher risk of having anterior uveitis, with the risks described in the previous section of ‘Uveitis’

 

For the laser to act on the iris, it must first cross the cornea, and it is necessary that the cornea be transparent in order to be crossed. If the cornea has opacities, the laser will not be able to act on the iris that is under these opacities, leaving those areas darker. Even the cornea itself could absorb part of the laser energy and become inflamed (corneal edema) or become more opaque.

 

The depigmentation process can take many sessions, depending on the thickness of the iris pigment and its response to the laser. In addition, the lightening of the iris always happens towards gray (dark, medium or light) or gray-blue colors. The procedure is not recommended in people who are looking for a faster result, or outside the spectrum of lightening that our procedure can achieve.

 

Because the Yeux Clairs procedure is purely aesthetic, it can only be performed on people over 18 years of age without exception.

 

Safety and
Efficacy

The Yeux Clairs procedure is safe and highly effective. In every case we have achieved a notable lightening of the iris after 10 sessions.

The laser acts specifically on the melanine, without affecting any other eye structure. With our laser application technique, only the melanin of the frontal part of  the iris is affected without affecting the back layer, responsible of blocking the light so it can only enter to the eye through the pupil.

During all the procedure only subtle changes on the color are observed. A 2 to 3 week period has to pass in order to start to see the changes, and they stabilize up to 2 to 3 months later.

The color obtained after the treatment CANNOT be predicted and CANNOT be chosen. The color depends on multiple factors like the iris initial pigmentation, the slopes in the superficial iris elevation or the color distribution and genetic variations.

The most common iris color obtained after the treatment is gray-blue, from dark to light.

The Yeux Clairs procedure is very safe, it does not cause any decrease in vision, light sensitivity, chronic inflammation in the eyes, glaucoma, pupil alterations or glasses requirement.

We’ve been applying Yeux Clairs procedure without finding any kind of long-term complication. Nevertheless, it is not risk-free, as is with any kind of procedure. The possible short-term complications that could develop, like blurred or cloudy vision, high intraocular pressure, stinging or red eyes, are transitory and disappear in a few hours up to a few days.

Although the procedure is very safe, it is not exempt of potential risks, like:

 

Due to the application of the laser, it could happen that the iris fibers come together and form a scar that affects the shape of the pupil and loses its circularity. Although this is very rare, when it happens it can affect the way the iris looks once it has lighten up with the procedure. This has no impact on the vision.

In the event that a laser beam crosses into the retina, either by eye movement or through some thinning of the iris, it can result in a burn or hemorrhage of the macular or retinal area risking of creating an area without vision in the visual field that could diminish vision in a transient or permanent way.

Due to the application of the laser, it may happen that the iris gets inflamed, which could cause pain and blurred vision, besides damage to the iris, damage to the cornea and damage to the trabecular meshwork. This is controlled with topical anti-inflammatory medication and generally manages to avoid potential damage to the eye.

As a result of the inflammation caused by the laser impacts on the iris and/or the remains that remain in the eye fluid, the intraocular pressure could rise, usually transiently, which could cause damage to some structure of the eye. This is controlled with topical antihypertensive medication and generally manages to avoid potential damage to the eye.

It could happen that the inflammation caused after the application of the laser generates adhesions of the iris to the trabecular meshwork, which is the natural drainage of the eye. This could lead to glaucoma, which would require specialized treatment that could require surgical treatments for its control. It also could cause tractions on the iris causing discoria (deviations or distortions of the pupil).

During treatment, laser impacts may result in iris bleeding that may result in discontinuation of that treatment session. This usually resolves within the next few days and is not a contraindication for continuing the subsequent laser applications required.

Because the laser passes through the cornea, it is possible to have the situation in which the corneal endothelium, responsible for keeping the cornea clear, could be damaged causing an over-hydration of the cornea. This may cause blurred vision that may require a cornea transplant.

The application of the laser could cross the iris, either through the pupil or through the same iris, and cause damage to the lens, which could occasion the appearance of a cataract, whether acute or chronic. In case of the occurrence of a cataract, a surgical intervention is required to remove it.

Due to the application of the laser, it could happen that the fibers of the iris could separate or break and cause a hole in the iris. Although this is very rare, when it happens it can increase the likelihood of causing a cataract, or a burn or hemorrhage in the macula or retina.

As a consequence of the laser impacts near the constrictor muscle of the pupil, it could be the case that this muscle (or its vascularization) could be damaged and cause permanent pupil dilation (Pupil of Urrets-Zavalía), which would cause high sensitivity to light and presence of optical aberrations.

To avoid any of these risks or complications, it is mandatory to follow all instructions during and after each session, including:

During the procedure it is mandatory to stare only where the ophthalmologist says.

After each session, the treatment must be used in the correct way.

Yeux Clairs procedure is not for everyone. There are certain conditions that could make the procedure unsuitable or impossible to be performed. These conditions can be, but not limited to:

During the procedure, it is required to be looking at a target while the laser is being applied to the iris. By presenting involuntary or uncontrollable movements of the eyes, the risk that the laser can pass through the pupil increases, causing bleeding or burns in the retina or a cataract.

During the procedure, it is required to remain seated, with minimal movements, while the laser is being applied to the iris. By presenting involuntary or uncontrollable movements of any part of the body, the risk that the laser can pass through the pupil increases, causing bleeding or burns in the retina or a cataract.

These involuntary movements can be: tics, spasms, tremors, contractures, etc.

As the laser causes inflammation within the eye and this inflammation must be absorbed and filtered by the eye, people with a history of diagnosis of glaucoma (either with or without treatment) may develop increased intraocular pressure that could damage the optic nerve.

 

As the laser causes inflammation within the eye, people with history of diagnosis of uveitis could have severe inflammation and develop an episode of anterior uveitis that could lead to complications such as adhesions in the iris, increased intraocular pressure, and all complications associated with anterior uveitis

 

People with history of autoimmune diseases, such as Lupus, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Psoriasis, etc., may be at a higher risk of having anterior uveitis, with the risks described in the previous section of ‘Uveitis’

 

For the laser to act on the iris, it must first cross the cornea, and it is necessary that the cornea be transparent in order to be crossed. If the cornea has opacities, the laser will not be able to act on the iris that is under these opacities, leaving those areas darker. Even the cornea itself could absorb part of the laser energy and become inflamed (corneal edema) or become more opaque.

 

The depigmentation process can take many sessions, depending on the thickness of the iris pigment and its response to the laser. In addition, the lightening of the iris always happens towards gray (dark, medium or light) or gray-blue colors. The procedure is not recommended in people who are looking for a faster result, or outside the spectrum of lightening that our procedure can achieve.

 

Because the Yeux Clairs procedure is purely aesthetic, it can only be performed on people over 18 years of age without exception.